We're really digging the alternating black and gray stained wood cabinets in this deVOL kitchen. The varied tones (plus texture) adds interest to a neutral space. The sandy beige walls keep things neutral but warms thing a little more than a crisp white or super light gray. The shearling chair cover warms up, too, and the interior window creates flow and spreads the light.
If you plan to remain in your house for years, then you should consider splurging on items like new countertops, appliances, cabinets and flooring. The fact you'll be living in the house for years to come means that you could save money on repair or replacement because they last longer. It also means that you continue to find value in their repeated use. If you plan to live in your house for years or decades after the renovation, there's no point in spending money and only making small changes.
If you decide to go with a major remodel and spend upwards of $50,000, you should consider consulting a kitchen designer. A professional designer has the experience, connections and examples to suggest what fits with your plan. He or she can also help you save where possible, so you don't spend needlessly while still getting the final product you want.

When the goal is rustic simplicity, there's no need to spend tons on custom cabinetry and granite counters. Paint transformed oak cabinets, bought off the rack at Lowe's and topped with Ikea's birch slabs, while the same white semigloss brightened stools from Walmart. An old tablecloth was used as a skirt for the farmhouse sink, and classic glass cannisters, also Walmart finds, were used for storage instead of upper cabinets.


Fabric impresario John Robshaw's Connecticut country house is quaint and colorful. Just because the kitchen is petite doesn't mean it is any less full of life. The kitchen’s settee is by Richard Wrightman, the sink fittings are by Newport Brass, the ceiling lights are by Restoration Hardware, the countertops are marble, and the custom dhurrie is by Robshaw. The walls are painted in Rose Quartz and the cabinetry in Starry Night, both by Benjamin Moore.
Yes, a brand-new kitchen will likely attract new buyers, but quartz countertops and a Viking range aren’t going to save the deal if the home inspection reveals serious problems elsewhere in the home. If you’re contemplating spending thousands of dollars to get your home ready to sell, first take care of serious red flags like structural issues, a leaky roof, a failing HVAC system or electrical problems.
Amanda Seyfried's Catskills retreat, designed by General Assembly, is a stylish (and slightly quieter) alternative to Hamptons living. Inside the kitchen, perfect for entertaining despite the limited square-footage, the range and hood are by Wolf, the Whitehaus sink is fitted with a Kallista faucet, and the backsplash is of tiles by Heath Ceramics. The island has a countertop of Caesarstone, the pairs of pendant lights are by Tom Dixon, and the cabinets are painted in Aganthus Green by Benjamin Moore.
There is so much you can do and you don’t even have to spend a lot of money. You’re very creative, I love your ideas and your new kitchen! And also the fact that you have such great light in it. These wooden tops are the best thing. in my opinion, and the open shelving idea is awesome in some places (like you have it) but it wouldn’t be good to have it on the whole area.
Professional kitchen designers charge $100 to $200 per hour. Though the NKBA suggests four percent of your budget will go to design fees, this shoots up to closer to 10 percent when you hire a certified professional on-site. If you get advice or an in-home consultation from a materials and design store, it will certainly stay in the range of a $100 to $800 flat fee. However, homeowners report paying $3,500 to $18,500 for certified professionals and independent services. At this rate, you might expect such services as:
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