There are several elements in your kitchen with storage capabilities. Most homeowners start with their cabinets. If you need new cabinets, now is the time to update storage capacity with drawer inserts, roll-out trays or more shelves. You can also choose a closed cabinet design, a glass face to display the items in the cabinets, or even have open shelving.
Professional kitchen designers charge $100 to $200 per hour. Though the NKBA suggests four percent of your budget will go to design fees, this shoots up to closer to 10 percent when you hire a certified professional on-site. If you get advice or an in-home consultation from a materials and design store, it will certainly stay in the range of a $100 to $800 flat fee. However, homeowners report paying $3,500 to $18,500 for certified professionals and independent services. At this rate, you might expect such services as:

Looks can be deceiving. Just because something looks pretty doesn’t mean it’s going to enhance your life. For the kitchen, make sure to choose durable materials. Limestone may look beautiful, but it’s vulnerable to water rings. Marble is prone to etching and staining. Recycled glass countertops may seem sleek, but they can chip and crack much easier than other options. Quartz is a great option for your renovation if you want the look but don’t want the problems. Here are some incredible kitchen remodeling ideas to consider.


In a charming Paris apartment, an open-concept kitchen and dining area is outfitted with 17th-century French chairs, a Napoleon III chandelier, along with a backsplash featuring 18th-century Portuguese tile. The custom French oak boiseries and cabinets are in the style of the 18th century. The kitchen's flooring is antique oak and the fireplace is original to the apartment.
Unless your goal is to immediately sell your house, it’s best to design a kitchen you’ll love. Ultimately, your kitchen is more than an investment. It’s where you provide for and nurture your family. The kitchen is where you entertain friends and guests. It’s the living and breathing hub of your home, where thinking, conversing, and resting happens.

If a total kitchen transformation is what you’re after, it’s time to redo your flooring. Many choices are available nowadays. And if you’re looking for a durable, easy-to-clean option and love the traditional appeal of hardwood, consider a wood-look alternative such as vinyl or this glazed ceramic tile, which you can also use on the wall as a rustic backsplash.
You may not have wide-open spaces in your pint-sized kitchen, but you do have lots of choices. In fact, these choices loom larger in a small space than in today’s basic Taj Mahal-sized kitchen. In a big area you can more easily hide flaws or separate competing styles; in a small space everything really has to work, including the mix of wood and metals and other surface materials. And because your petite kitchen may be short on interesting architectural details, it’s up to you to add the all-important style in compelling countertop surfaces, cabinetry, fixtures, flooring, lighting and color. Is there any place you can add a pleasing curve? Will your granite countertop (more affordable in a small space!) coexist with your cabinet color? Your best bet is to create a mix board with samples and swatches of everything you’re considering. One tip: using the same color and style of fixtures and cabinet pulls can help unify a look.
In the West North Central region (including North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas and Missouri), a minor kitchen remodel only ranks seventh in terms of ROI. Adding midrange manufactured stone veneer to the home’s exterior has the highest recoup of any upgrade — 82.8 percent — followed by garage door replacement at 82.4 percent.
When planning for this project, ask yourself how long you plan to live in your house from the time of the remodel. If you plan to sell shortly after, you shouldn't spend too much money on it. The rule of thumb is that you should spend between 5 and 15 percent of your property's total value. This is the optimum range for homeowners to spend and expect to recoup.
Big double sinks or farmhouse sinks eat up valuable counter space. Also, think long and hard about whether you really want bigger appliances. Side-by-side fridges are great, but you want to conserve width when it comes to the appliances. Are you a single person or a couple? More economical dishwashers are available, too. If you have any out-of-kitchen area available (e.g., can you put in a pantry around the corner?), use that for items you don't use frequently, such as canned goods or appliances.
As seen on HGTV's House Hunters Renovation, homeowners Dax and Ashley Rohrer remodeled the entire interior of the home in the Eagle Rock neighborhood of Los Angeles, California, installing hardwood flooring throughout, and opening up the kitchen to the dining area and living room by removing a low wall. Concrete countertops provide a simple surface that contrasts well with the olive green tile backsplash, and a farmhouse sink and lots of cabinets add functionality. (after)
Remodeling your kitchen is the perfect opportunity to create a design that’s based on your individual needs. Focus on who will be using the kitchen most and how many people will be working in the space at one time. You’ll want to ensure you have room to work and move around as needed, so consider the work triangle in your new layout. You’ll also want to think about a dining area, how often you entertain, and what a kitchen with guests would look like. Our team of kitchen designers can develop a variety of options to ensure your new kitchen perfectly fits your lifestyle.

Designer Kathie Chrisicos updated this Manhattan high-rise kitchen using a soft color palette in green and white to suggest a delicate and airy sensibility. The soft greenish-blue tones on the Roman shade, backsplash and countertop add just the right hint of color to the beautiful white cabinetry. Stainless steel appliances complete the room's serene and elegant design.


You don't have a lot of spaces to adorn in a small kitchen. So when they are available, adorn these spaces to be sumptuous. The backsplash is the perfect place to start since a fancy treatment here will liven up the entire kitchen. A small kitchen backsplash is not a lot of square footage, so if you want lavish limestone, glistening glass mosaic, or antique tin tile in the backsplash, chances are good that your budget can support it.
When you're working with $15,000 to $30,000, you can leave more work to the professionals instead of doing it yourself. This might include refinishing or refacing your cabinets, painting the walls and ceilings, installing new lighting and rewiring some electrical work. You can also focus on replacing your flooring, if it's particularly worn, and look at more high-grade countertop material like stone (granite, Corian, Formica). You might be able to invest in custom cabinets, move some plumbing, or have an island installed in this price range, but you might have to compromise on other upgrades in the process.
Since dimensions are diminutive, you may be able to afford a beautiful tumbled marble that can give you a touch of the outdoors. Of course, marble can be really cold and hard underfoot, but the impact may be worth it to you. Or try cork, which is the number one flooring used in industrial kitchens in the United States. You’ll have to make sure it’s properly sealed (water can make it expand), but it’s a beautiful choice. And you can feel smug about using a politically correct "green" flooring.
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