Fabric impresario John Robshaw's Connecticut country house is quaint and colorful. Just because the kitchen is petite doesn't mean it is any less full of life. The kitchen’s settee is by Richard Wrightman, the sink fittings are by Newport Brass, the ceiling lights are by Restoration Hardware, the countertops are marble, and the custom dhurrie is by Robshaw. The walls are painted in Rose Quartz and the cabinetry in Starry Night, both by Benjamin Moore.

Yes, a brand-new kitchen will likely attract new buyers, but quartz countertops and a Viking range aren’t going to save the deal if the home inspection reveals serious problems elsewhere in the home. If you’re contemplating spending thousands of dollars to get your home ready to sell, first take care of serious red flags like structural issues, a leaky roof, a failing HVAC system or electrical problems.


There are several elements in your kitchen with storage capabilities. Most homeowners start with their cabinets. If you need new cabinets, now is the time to update storage capacity with drawer inserts, roll-out trays or more shelves. You can also choose a closed cabinet design, a glass face to display the items in the cabinets, or even have open shelving.

Since dimensions are diminutive, you may be able to afford a beautiful tumbled marble that can give you a touch of the outdoors. Of course, marble can be really cold and hard underfoot, but the impact may be worth it to you. Or try cork, which is the number one flooring used in industrial kitchens in the United States. You’ll have to make sure it’s properly sealed (water can make it expand), but it’s a beautiful choice. And you can feel smug about using a politically correct "green" flooring. 
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