Far less expensive than replacing cabinets completely or even replacing the door fronts, refinishing or painting your cabinets can go a long way toward giving your kitchen a fresh, new look. This can definitely be a DIY project, but it’s time-consuming. Be prepared for a lot of prep work, like cleaning and sanding, to ensure a professional-looking finish.

If you plan to remain in your house for years, then you should consider splurging on items like new countertops, appliances, cabinets and flooring. The fact you'll be living in the house for years to come means that you could save money on repair or replacement because they last longer. It also means that you continue to find value in their repeated use. If you plan to live in your house for years or decades after the renovation, there's no point in spending money and only making small changes.


We're really digging the alternating black and gray stained wood cabinets in this deVOL kitchen. The varied tones (plus texture) adds interest to a neutral space. The sandy beige walls keep things neutral but warms thing a little more than a crisp white or super light gray. The shearling chair cover warms up, too, and the interior window creates flow and spreads the light.
Since dimensions are diminutive, you may be able to afford a beautiful tumbled marble that can give you a touch of the outdoors. Of course, marble can be really cold and hard underfoot, but the impact may be worth it to you. Or try cork, which is the number one flooring used in industrial kitchens in the United States. You’ll have to make sure it’s properly sealed (water can make it expand), but it’s a beautiful choice. And you can feel smug about using a politically correct "green" flooring.

You may not have wide-open spaces in your pint-sized kitchen, but you do have lots of choices. In fact, these choices loom larger in a small space than in today’s basic Taj Mahal-sized kitchen. In a big area you can more easily hide flaws or separate competing styles; in a small space everything really has to work, including the mix of wood and metals and other surface materials. And because your petite kitchen may be short on interesting architectural details, it’s up to you to add the all-important style in compelling countertop surfaces, cabinetry, fixtures, flooring, lighting and color. Is there any place you can add a pleasing curve? Will your granite countertop (more affordable in a small space!) coexist with your cabinet color? Your best bet is to create a mix board with samples and swatches of everything you’re considering. One tip: using the same color and style of fixtures and cabinet pulls can help unify a look.

Like any other room, your small kitchen needs a combination of task and atmospheric lighting. Fluorescent lighting, which casts a bluish light impacting the colorization of objects in the room, including the food, is frequently found in kitchens. To counteract it, consider hanging pendant lights that bathe your eating area in a more appetizing color. And try these easy ways to increase the feeling of size in your small kitchen:
Professional kitchen designers charge $100 to $200 per hour. Though the NKBA suggests four percent of your budget will go to design fees, this shoots up to closer to 10 percent when you hire a certified professional on-site. If you get advice or an in-home consultation from a materials and design store, it will certainly stay in the range of a $100 to $800 flat fee. However, homeowners report paying $3,500 to $18,500 for certified professionals and independent services. At this rate, you might expect such services as:
One of the simplest ways of "expanding" a kitchen is incorporating glass, which lets you see through the objects, thereby enhancing the feeling of spaciousness or what designers call "negative space." Try a glass counter or tabletop, or glass door cabinets. Glass kitchen doors, to the outside world or to the next room, can also visually expand the space. There is even highly reflective glass tile that can give your kitchen sparkle. Mirrors, in a backsplash or strategically placed around the room, also lighten up the look.
You might want to put in some deliberate design planning if you want to have a successful restaurant kitchen. You may choose to follow a standard construction or sit down with one of our designers to create a customized solution. We will cover all the functional areas of the kitchen including the sinks, countertops, storage cabinets, and cooking appliances.

But thankfully, so-called slim-line refrigerators are becoming a bigger seller for appliance manufacturers, ideal for people who live in urban condos and even postage stamp-sized apartments (micro apartments or apodments). The model shown here is a mere 24 inches wide and holds 9.7 cubic feet in the cooling compartment and 3.3 cubic feet in the freezer. Small and stylish, it's from Liebherr.

Hacks for small space are highly needed by those people who have small space. As small space makes the vibe and ambiance of the house become suffocating and uncomfortable, you need to trick it by getting to know the hacks which can help you make the visual looks bigger and wider. No, it isn’t only about adding mirror to add the visual length of the space that you have. it is more about the hacks of the furniture or house utensils which can be double in the usage that people might not be aware of it.


The kitchen work triangle is the area where most tasks are performed in your kitchen. This usually involves the refrigerator, the stove, and the sink. The spacing of these items is essential, as you’ll spend a lot of time moving back and forth between these three focal points. Our kitchen designers will help you find the optimal location for your work triangle. We will design your kitchen to be functional to fit your specific needs.
Face it, in a small space you can’t have a kitchen that is a jack-of-all-trades — accommodating schoolwork, mail, laundry, recipe hunting and cooking duties. Unless you don’t cook at all (in which case, feel free to store your out-of-season clothes in the kitchen cabinets!), the small kitchen’s main chore is meal prep. So focus first on function, making sure you have the appliances and work areas you need. You may be able to save a bit of space by using scaled-down or innovative appliances, including refrigerator and freezer drawers and pint-sized microwaves, stoves (some with just two burners) and single sinks. The function is there, without all the square footage! If workspace is at a premium, consider a small-scale island or a counter-topped cart that can be rolled away into a closet when not in use.
Keeping your existing kitchen appliances can save you money in the short-term. If your stove, oven, dishwasher or fridge isn't Energy Star-certified, however, you should consider upgrading them. Energy-efficient appliances pay for themselves over time by lowering your utility bills, and they help to preserve the environment, too. Additional electrical rewiring may be required to accommodate Energy Star appliances.

The price of new countertops differs widely based on materials. Stone surfaces, like quartz and granite, are the most durable, but also the most expensive. Solid surface and laminate are less costly but require more maintenance. Ceramic tiles are generally an affordable backsplash alternative, depending on their brand and the complexity of the tiling layout.
We do not have a preferred concept. We can offer you something that we’ve previously done. We can also work with you to develop a new idea. You can opt-in for a free consultation, where one of our professional designers will analyze the basic requirements and workout out a possible estimate. Our main ambition remains to serve your interests in the most efficient way possible.

If you plan to remain in your house for years, then you should consider splurging on items like new countertops, appliances, cabinets and flooring. The fact you'll be living in the house for years to come means that you could save money on repair or replacement because they last longer. It also means that you continue to find value in their repeated use. If you plan to live in your house for years or decades after the renovation, there's no point in spending money and only making small changes.
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