One of the simplest ways of "expanding" a kitchen is incorporating glass, which lets you see through the objects, thereby enhancing the feeling of spaciousness or what designers call "negative space." Try a glass counter or tabletop, or glass door cabinets. Glass kitchen doors, to the outside world or to the next room, can also visually expand the space. There is even highly reflective glass tile that can give your kitchen sparkle. Mirrors, in a backsplash or strategically placed around the room, also lighten up the look.
If a door into the garden is not possible, put a garden in your kitchen. Create an area in front of a sunny window or have a garden window installed. Garden windows extend out, giving you a wide ledge to set plants on and more window area to let the sunlight in. They vary in price from around $800 to $7,000, depending on the size and style. Another good option is a dedicated corner with an AeroGarden.
You will be taught on how to double the space for your pantry with tons of food and tins and everything around. When you have limited space for doing all of your laundry, you can transform it into a neat and totally well arranged pantry to stock up all of your food during the winter. This is really a good deal for whoever lacks the space for their pantry and ends up in their biggest disappointment. Thus, you can at least make your home to be a better place rather than reducing the food stock in your house for the upcoming winter. These organization hacks for small space would work up perfectly and completely for all of you. Check this link for more information.
The homeowners replaced the awkward upper cabinets with shelving that makes the most of the kitchen's pitched ceiling. They also ditched the lower cabinets for freestanding components, including a stainless steel rolling island and a mango-wood Crate & Barrel console fitted with a marble top. A red Aga gas stove offers a serious upgrade over the old electric model.
The color of walls, appliances, counters, stools — even the dishtowels — can change the atmosphere and perceived size of the kitchen. Pastels or light colors, with good doses of white, reflect light drawing the eyes upward and make the room seem taller. But don't think you have to be a color chicken in a small space. Bold colorations can be very effective in smaller kitchens. How about some Porsche red metal cabinets with celery green walls and a banana-colored concrete countertop? That’ll get your motor started in the morning!
With thousands of online home listings at your fingertips, it’s easy to compare your home to the latest and greatest in kitchen trends. But that doesn’t mean that every buyer is expecting a brand-new kitchen. If you don’t want to go through the headache, time and expense of a minor or major kitchen remodel and there’s nothing functionally wrong with your kitchen, selling without remodeling first might be your best bet.

Since dimensions are diminutive, you may be able to afford a beautiful tumbled marble that can give you a touch of the outdoors. Of course, marble can be really cold and hard underfoot, but the impact may be worth it to you. Or try cork, which is the number one flooring used in industrial kitchens in the United States. You’ll have to make sure it’s properly sealed (water can make it expand), but it’s a beautiful choice. And you can feel smug about using a politically correct "green" flooring.
If you plan to remain in your house for years, then you should consider splurging on items like new countertops, appliances, cabinets and flooring. The fact you'll be living in the house for years to come means that you could save money on repair or replacement because they last longer. It also means that you continue to find value in their repeated use. If you plan to live in your house for years or decades after the renovation, there's no point in spending money and only making small changes.
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