DIY enthusiasts might be tempted to use their skills and creativity to do a kitchen renovation totally on their own. That’s what doing it yourself means, right? But as anyone who has gone through a renovation will tell you, expert advice is always helpful, even for a DIY kitchen renovation. A professional can help you fine-tune your plan and offer advice that could save you from purchasing inefficient products and materials and choosing a design that doesn’t fit your needs. You can even stop by many home centers for a free consultation. Check out these kitchen remodeling ideas and tips.

We're really digging the alternating black and gray stained wood cabinets in this deVOL kitchen. The varied tones (plus texture) adds interest to a neutral space. The sandy beige walls keep things neutral but warms thing a little more than a crisp white or super light gray. The shearling chair cover warms up, too, and the interior window creates flow and spreads the light.
The kitchen of this home needed to have character like the rest of this vintage home so designers added bright, bold colors and mixed shiny, smooth textures with vintage favorites. The bright blue backsplash was one of the flashy, glamorous pieces and by mixing that with more traditional cabinets, the space gets a touch of the old world and the new.
Start early and take your time to find bargains. First, research products so you can evaluate quality. Next, look online and at discount outlets for deals. Keep in mind that buy in-stock merchandise usually costs less. Finally, if you find a product you like that’s out of budget, look for similar styles at less expensive retailers. You could also try shopping at reuse centers and salvage stores.

But investing thousands of dollars into a full kitchen transformation before listing your home for sale might not be the best investment. Unless your kitchen is extremely dated, dysfunctional or damaged, the odds of you seeing a 100 percent return on investment on a kitchen remodel is rare. However, giving your kitchen a mini face-lift can be enough to compete with other homes on the market without breaking the bank.


With thousands of online home listings at your fingertips, it’s easy to compare your home to the latest and greatest in kitchen trends. But that doesn’t mean that every buyer is expecting a brand-new kitchen. If you don’t want to go through the headache, time and expense of a minor or major kitchen remodel and there’s nothing functionally wrong with your kitchen, selling without remodeling first might be your best bet.
After you and one of our kitchen designers have selected from all the great products our stores have to offer, don’t forget: The Home Depot’s high-quality contractors can do it for you! While other kitchen remodeling companies in your area may be able to get the job done, our installers and contractors will get the job done right and have the nation’s largest home improvement retailer supporting them every step of the way. Be sure to ask your in-store designer how to take the next step in your kitchen remodel process with our installation services.
But thankfully, so-called slim-line refrigerators are becoming a bigger seller for appliance manufacturers, ideal for people who live in urban condos and even postage stamp-sized apartments (micro apartments or apodments). The model shown here is a mere 24 inches wide and holds 9.7 cubic feet in the cooling compartment and 3.3 cubic feet in the freezer. Small and stylish, it's from Liebherr.
Installing kitchen appliances costs $100 to $300 per appliance on average. Investing in higher quality stoves, dishwashers or refrigerators will certainly drive up your total price. However, if you want to improve your home’s value, it will pay to install higher quality products. There are various options to choose from, including EnergyStar-certified, custom built-in, high-end store bought and budget outlet products. If longevity is important to you, look for products with longer life expectancies.
Squeeze a narrow cupboard in next to the stove, if possible. These cupboards are generally used to store shallow pans and cookie sheets vertically. Some of them have a slide-out spice rack, too. Even if the cupboard can be only 9 inches wide, that gives you additional storage space and a 10-inch wide counter next to the stove for an additional $150 to $200.
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