It's a visual illusion—tiny floor tiles make your small kitchen feel busy and cramped; large tiles make it feel airier and larger. One reason for this is that with the large tiles, you're reducing the number of grout lines. Go for nothing smaller than standard 12 x 12-inch tiles, but preferably larger. Shown here are 18 x 18-inch Carriage House Straw Sky tiles from American Olean.
But thankfully, so-called slim-line refrigerators are becoming a bigger seller for appliance manufacturers, ideal for people who live in urban condos and even postage stamp-sized apartments (micro apartments or apodments). The model shown here is a mere 24 inches wide and holds 9.7 cubic feet in the cooling compartment and 3.3 cubic feet in the freezer. Small and stylish, it's from Liebherr.
Building a budget should be your number one concern when planning a kitchen remodel. It determines how much you can accomplish, the materials available, how much professional help you’ll need, and what the final product will look like, among other aspects. If you don't plan appropriately, there's a good chance that you will find yourself in debt by the end of the project or left with a half-finished space after the funds run out.

Since dimensions are diminutive, you may be able to afford a beautiful tumbled marble that can give you a touch of the outdoors. Of course, marble can be really cold and hard underfoot, but the impact may be worth it to you. Or try cork, which is the number one flooring used in industrial kitchens in the United States. You’ll have to make sure it’s properly sealed (water can make it expand), but it’s a beautiful choice. And you can feel smug about using a politically correct "green" flooring.
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